Combined Honours BA in Criminology and Policing

Combined Honours BA in Criminology and Policing

Combined Honours BA in Criminology and Policing

Are you passionate about public safety? Do you have a desire to go into your chosen field prepared with focused techniques and real-world experience? Consider a dual major in criminology and policing with Wilfrid Laurier University’s fully online Combined Honours BA in Criminology and Policing.

Facts About the Program

  • We are the nation’s first and only 100% online Combined Honours BA in Criminology and Policing program, which means classes are accessible and convenient, 24 hours a day, seven days a week
  • Laurier has produced career-ready professionals for more than 100 years. As a result, you’ll enter a policing and criminology program with an established curriculum taught by faculty who have worked in the field, including positions as research officers, legal analysts, investigators, correctional workers and more.
  • You can take as little as one, or as many as three 12-week courses at a time to complete this 20-credit degree.
  • A criminology degree and  policing degree is perfect for someone seeking to further a career as a police, correctional or border services officer.
  • No prior experience or college degree is required. Students must have a mid- 70s average with high school, university-level English or equivalent at 60 percent. For more information on admissions requirements, visit the Admissions Requirements & Tuition section below.
  • For more details on the skills you will gain from the online BA in Criminology & Policing, click on the Program Goal section and for course details, click on the Curriculum section below

Career Outcomes

According to Statistics Canada, one out of four workers in the labour force will be 55 or older by 2021. This is a significant opportunity for young workers, experienced professionals and older adult learners to take advantage of increased labour force fluctuations and mobility. The online combined BA in Criminology/Policing gives you a broader educational base to succeed in jobs related to crime and justice and in, while allowing you to focus on specific areas of interest through curriculum electives. Careers in criminology and policing to explore include:

  • Police officer — If your desire is to become a police officer, you can get the background you need to potentially enter the service. A cadet in training can earn more than $50,000 a year.
  • Correctional worker — This includes court workers, parole and probation officers, as well as victim services staff. A correctional worker can earn more than $55,000 a year.
  • Private security — Individuals with police experience sometimes transition to this career. Whether part of a firm or a consultant, the paths graduates take and the salary they make depend on the type of security work they’re doing.
  • Border services — A border services officer can earn more than $55,000 a year. To enter this profession, you must pass the Officer Induction Training Program.
  • Insurance and Insurance Fraud Worker — A fraud investigator can earn an average salary of more than $59,000 a year, while an individual in a general insurance position can earn $50,000 to $70,000.

*Sources: Payscale.com, Toronto Police Service, Canada Border Services Agency

For more details on the online BA in Policing program, expand the sections below:

According to Statistics Canada, one out of four workers in the labour force will be 55 or older by 2021. This is a significant opportunity for young workers, experienced professionals and older adult learners to take advantage of increased labour force fluctuations and mobility. The online combined BA in Criminology/Policing gives you a broader educational base to succeed in jobs related to crime and justice and in, while allowing you to focus on specific areas of interest through curriculum electives. Careers in criminology and policing to explore include:

  • Police officer — If your desire is to become a police officer, you can get the background you need to potentially enter the service. A cadet in training can earn more than $50,000 a year.
  • Correctional worker — This includes court workers, parole and probation officers, as well as victim services staff. A correctional worker can earn more than $55,000 a year.
  • Private security — Individuals with police experience sometimes transition to this career. Whether part of a firm or a consultant, the paths graduates take and the salary they make depend on the type of security work they’re doing.
  • Border services — A border services officer can earn more than $55,000 a year. To enter this profession, you must pass the Officer Induction Training Program.
  • Insurance and Insurance Fraud Worker — A fraud investigator can earn an average salary of more than $59,000 a year, while an individual in a general insurance position can earn $50,000 to $70,000.

 

*Sources: Payscale.com, Toronto Police Service, Canada Border Services Agency

For more details on the online BA in Policing program, expand the sections below

Admissions Requirements

Requirements

Although no prior experience in law enforcement is needed, the combined honours criminology/policing degree program requires an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (or equivalent) with a mid-70s average, including university-level English at 60%.

In addition, no credit will be given for experience at this time, though individuals with at least one year of education from a university or currently attending university and looking to transfer are eligible for transfer credits. The exact cost of Wilfrid Laurier tuition depends on your situation, individuals with at least one year of education from a university or currently attending university and looking to transfer are eligible for transfer credits. Financial aid through Laurier might also be available.

After you apply, an admissions coordinator will assess your transcripts to determine how many transfer credits you may receive.

Tuition

Coursework in the criminology/policing program focuses on two classes in a 12-week period. Each class is 0.5 credits and costs $712 (and $100 incidental fee). The exact cost of Wilfrid Laurier tuition depends on your situation, individuals with at least one year of education from a university or currently attending university and looking to transfer are eligible for transfer credits. Financial aid through Laurier might also be available.

Program Goals

The Ministry of Advanced Education & Skills Development recognizes crime and justice as areas of institutional strength for Laurier.  With experienced faculty and modern curriculum, you can:

  • Learn how to answer the question of “why did a crime occur” and the social as well as psychological aspects in answering that question. Policing focuses on the critical issues identified by law enforcement leaders across Canada.

  • Build your knowledge through courses such as Youth Justice, Addiction and Crime, Crimes Against Humanity, and more while learning about diverse communities.

  • Improve your research, police communication skills, and writing skills to become  a desirable candidate — whether you want to work more hands-on with the justice system or go into an academic setting.

  • Test and challenge your knowledge through innovative lectures, case studies and seminars.   

  • Explore the dimensions of policing through both macro-level analyses that focus on the institutional contexts of policing and microlevel analyses that focus on the experiential aspects of policing

  • Learn about intelligence and personality testing, the effects of experiencing trauma and compassion fatigue, the importance of stress management, self-care and fit-for-duty assessments

  • Improve your reasoning and communication skills by learning how to  identify arguments, analyze their structure and critically assess their validity

  • Become familiar with different forms of data collection and analysis both quantitative and qualitative and how they are used in policing and other occupations

  • Examine the various manifestations of domestic violence, including physical, sexual, psychological, social and economic abuse of intimate partners, children and elders.

  • Examine the impacts of social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube on law enforcement and investigation practices

  • Explore contemporary issues of ethics, corruption and accountability for law enforcement personnel as well as apply relevant criminological theories to understand well-known cases of police corruption, racial profiling, noble cause policing and use of excessive force.

  • Learn how to apply use of force theory along with the basic physical skills required to de-escalate/escape, mediate or gain control of human crisis situations.

  • Participate in an-depth exploration of the legal, social and technical issues related to cybercrime within a globalized context.

Curriculum

The online Combined Honours BA in Criminology and Policing is 20 credits, including 12 credits of Policing and Criminology courses.  Elective transfer credits may be granted depending on assessment of previous studies from another institution.  Courses are 0.5 credit each and will run for 12 weeks beginning in Fall (Sept.-Dec.), Winter (January- April) and possible Spring (May – August) terms.  Students may enroll in a maximum of three courses per term, and are encouraged to consider a workload that fits their personal schedules each term.  Registration remains accessible even after enrolment lapses of up to 17 months.  This program is available to fully online students only.

*Courses written in Italics may be double counted towards both programs

Honours Policing Combination Degree Requirements

CC100 – Introduction to Criminology
OL109/MB109 Interpersonal Communications in Contemporary Society
(Exclusion:   PD101 6 week)
OL224/PD224 Organizational Leadership
(Exclusion: PD202 6 week)

PD200 Police Psychology

PD201 Intercultural Communication in Policing

PD203 Diversity in Policing

  • Prerequisite: A 0.5 credit selected from the following:  CC291/PD291, OL109, PD200, PD201, OL224/PD224 

PD204 Reasoning and Argumentation in the Criminal Justice System

  • Prerequisite: A 0.5 credit selected from the following:  CC291/PD291, OL109, PD200, PD201, OL224/PD224

PD205 Psychology and Law Enforcement

  • Prerequisite: A 0.5 credit selected from the following:  CC291/PD291, OL109, PD200, PD201, OL224/PD224

CC291/PD291 Introduction to Policing  (Exclusion:  PD100)

  • Prerequisite: CC100 or CC102 Senior student status

OL233/HS233/CC233  Introduction to Social Science Research Methods  (Exclusion:  PD300 6 week)

  • Prerequisite BF290 or CC291PD291 and registration status: senior student

CC426/PD426 Qualitative Methodologies in Criminology (Exclusion: PD400 6 week)

  • Prerequisite-CC100 and OL/CC/HS233 or PS295 and Year 4 status in Crim or Policing

1.5 senior credits (3 x 0.5 credit courses) chosen from:

PD301 Policing a Complex and Diverse Community

  • Prerequisite: 0.5 credit from CC291/PD291, OL109, PD200

PD302 Indigenous Peoples’ Political Structures

  • Prerequisite- CC291/PD291  

CC/HS/PD312 Mental Health and Justice

(Exclusion:  PD303 6 week)

  • Prerequisite- CC100 or CC102, Senior student status

PD304 Domestic Violence

  • Prerequisite- One of CC291/PD291, OL109, PD200

PD305 Media, Social Media, and Crime

  • Prerequisite- One of OL109, PD204, PD205

PD306 Ethics, Corruption, and Police Accountability

  • Prerequisite- OL224/PD224 and one of CC291/PD291, OL109, PD200, PD201

0.5 400 level credit chosen from:

PD401 Civil Unrest:  The State’s Use of Force Against its Citizens

  • Prerequisite- PD204 and one of CC291/PD291, OL109

PD402:  Indigenous Communities and Policing

  • Prerequisite-POL109 or PD201 

PD403 Immigration and Conflict Zones

  • Prerequisite- CC291and PD301

PD404 Cybercrime

  • Prerequisite- CC291/PD291 and PD305

Honours Criminology Combination Degree Requirements

CC100 – Introduction to Criminology

CC102 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System

CC210 Psychology of Crime

  • Prerequisite- CC100

CC290 Theories of Crime I

  • Prerequisite- CC100 or LY100

CC390 Theories of Crime II

  • Prerequisite- CC290

CC327 Statistics in Criminology and Criminal Justice

  • Prerequisite-CC100 and CC233/OL233 or PS295

OL233/HS233/CC233  Introduction to Social Science Research Methods

(Exclusion:  PD300)

  • Prerequisite- BF290 or CC291/PD291 and registration status: senior student

CC426/PD426 Qualitative Methodologies in Criminology

  • Prerequisite- CC100 and CC233/OL233

3.0 additional senior CC credits including:

0.5 credit at the 300 level and 0.5 credit at the 400 level.  

Policing students select 1.0 of these 3.0 credits from:

CC291/PD291 Introduction to Policing = 0.5 credit

  • Prerequisite- CC100 or CC102, senior student

CC/HS/PD312 Mental Health and Justice=0.5 300 level

  • Prerequisite- CC100 or CC102, senior student

 

 

 

Course Descriptions

Policing Courses

CC100 – Introduction to Criminology

This course introduces students to the discipline of criminology from both a historical and a contemporary perspective. Students will be introduced to classical and contemporary theorists in the field, as well as research methods and disciplinary debates, with a focus on both Canadian and global issues in criminology.

OL109/MB109 Interpersonal Communications in Contemporary Society

(Exclusion:   PD101 6 week)

Communication skills are probably the single most important skill required to be successful in any type of relationship. This course will provide an introduction to research and theories in the field of interpersonal communications and how this information relates to individuals in contemporary society. In addition, the course focuses on building and enhancing your knowledge in the kinds of communications skills that employers expect.

OL224/PD224 Organizational Leadership (Exclusion: PD202 6 week)

This interdisciplinary course introduces students to a broad range of organizational types and students will examine the ways in which leaders shape and influence organizations. Historical, contemporary, and emerging leadership theories and debates will be covered.

(Exclusion:  PD202 6 week)

PD200 Police Psychology

This course will introduce students to the techniques used to measure and assess police personnel, and deepen their understanding of the on-the-job experiences that can affect the mental health of police personnel. Students will learn about intelligence and personality testing, the effects of experiencing trauma and compassion fatigue, the importance of stress management, self-care and fit-for-duty assessments.

PD201 Intercultural Communication in Policing

Intercultural Communication in Policing introduces students to the field of intercultural communication in order to recognize the challenges faced by law enforcement officials in understanding and interpreting the behaviours, actions and attitudes of individuals in conflict within their own communities, within the larger community and with the law. Topics include postmodern theory, cultural studies, critical race theory, race, racism and representation.

PD203 Diversity in Policing

Introduces students to topics to contribute to a working environment that is equitable and free of discrimination, harassment and disruptive of systems of advantage. Students will recognize and welcome the strengths of diversity within the force. Topics include the difference between diversity and inclusion (and the benefits of each), hegemonic masculinity, privilege, intersectionality and allyship. (Online Learning only).

Prerequisite: A 0.5 credit selected from the following:  CC291/PD291, OL109, PD200, PD201, OL224/PD224

PD204 Reasoning and Argumentation in the Criminal Justice System

This course focuses on developing the principles of logical reasoning and argumentation. Students will be able to identify arguments, analyze their structure and critically assess their validity. By learning the necessary skills to analyze informal reasoning, students will improve their reasoning, cognitive, communication and critical thinking skills, contributing to their ability to present sound arguments. (Online Learning only)

Prerequisite: A 0.5 credit selected from the following:  CC291/PD291, OL109, PD200, PD201, OL224/PD224

PD205 Psychology and Law Enforcement

This course will apply psychological principles and concepts to law enforcement. Students will increase their competency and understanding of interviewing, interrogation, hostage negotiation, eyewitness testimony and offender profiling. (Online Learning only). Prerequisite: A 0.5 credit selected from the following:  CC291/PD291, OL109, PD200, PD201, OL224/PD224

CC291/PD291 Introduction to Policing (Exclusion:  PD100)

This course provides an introduction to policing in Canada, and includes an examination of: the historical development of police services; the organization of occupational roles within policing; legal powers of the police; traditional and contemporary models of police work; and current issues in policing. These dimensions of policing will be explored through both macro-level analyses that focus on the institutional contexts of policing and microlevel analyses that focus on the experiential aspects of policing.  Prerequisite: CC100 or

CC102 Senior student status

OL233/HS233/CC233  Introduction to Social Science Research Methods  (Exclusion:  PD300 6 week)

Building on BF290, this course provides an introduction to social science research methodologies that is designed to enable students to read, understand, and critically evaluate social science research as well as to prepare students for more specialized courses in qualitative and quantitative research. Students will learn the philosophical (i.e., ontological and epistemological) basis for quantitative, qualitative, deductive and inductive research, how to frame research questions, operationalize concepts, and design studies suitable to quantitative and qualitative research and the limitations and advantages of various research designs (e.g., cross-sectional, experimental, case studies, ethnographies). The relationship between theoretical concepts, constructs and variables will be examined. Students will be introduced to current issues regarding research ethics. For quantitative research, students will become familiar with different forms of data collection and the following concepts: levels of measurement, the central limit theorem, measures of central tendency and variance, hypothesis testing, the standard error and probability sampling. For qualitative research, students will become familiar with different forms of data collection (e.g., observations, interviews, textual analysis) and basic strategies to categorize and code qualitative material.

Prerequisite BF290 or CC291/PD291 and registration status: senior student

PD301 Policing a Complex and Diverse Community

Examines key historical and sociopolitical issues in law enforcement practices to recognize their impact on marginalized populations. Students will expand their cultural awareness and improve intercultural communication skills to work more effectively and judiciously in a diverse community. Topics include critical race theory, cultural diversity and sensibility, tactical communication practices and racial profiling. (Online Learning only). Prerequisite: 0.5 credit from CC291/PD291, OL109, PD200

PD302 Indigenous Peoples’ Political Structures

First Nations Political Structures introduces students to First Nations Peoples’ laws and institutions, and criminal justice systems. In this course, students will gain awareness of the importance of preserving Indigenous justice systems. Students will develop an understanding of the effects of Western judicial systems and the strains they create for First Nations Peoples relationships with Western governments. Topics include indigenous identities, government policy implications, tensions between law enforcement officers and Indigenous Peoples on and off reserves, self-development and colonialism.

Prerequisite- CC291/PD291 

CC/HS/PD312 Mental Health and Justice (Exclusion:  PD303 6 week)

Students will identify what constitutes a mental disorder and understand the prevalence of various mental illnesses in Canada. Students will focus on legal issues related to mental health including NCRMD and fitness to stand trial procedures, provincial mental health legislation, risk assessment and management techniques, violence risk and victimization, dangerousness and stigma, and criminal justice policy. Prerequisite- CC100 or CC102, Senior student status

PD304 Domestic Violence

This course provides an in-depth analysis of issues surrounding domestic violence, including gendered power relationships, under the broader framework of the sociology of gender. Students will examine the various manifestations of domestic violence, including physical, sexual, psychological, social and economic abuse of intimate partners, children and elders. The types of interventions used to address domestic violence, as well as their costs, benefits and limitations will be considered. (Online Learning only). Prerequisite-One of CC291/PD291, OL109, PD200

PD305 Media, Social Media, and Crime

This course will examine the impacts of social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube on law enforcement and investigation practices. Students will learn how to effectively communicate with the general public through social media platforms. Students will be exposed to the current policies and legislation dealing with Social Media including the Freedom of Information Act, protection of privacy and delivering sensitive information. Conversely, students will be exposed to cultural criminal theories, critical Marxist theories and Foucauldian theory. In addition, students will identify how real-time virtual public platforms allow law enforcement officials to discover, conduct and analyze evidence in solving online crimes. In turn, law enforcement officials will be able to use social platforms as agents of social control to assist in reducing the amount of online/virtual deviance, i.e., cyberbullying. (Online Learning only). Prerequisite- One of OL109, PD101, PD204, PD205

PD306 Ethics. Corruption, and Police Accountability

This course will explore contemporary issues of ethics, corruption and accountability for law enforcement personnel. Specifically, this course will also explore how police institutions, the media, the public and overseeing bodies respond to allegations of unethical or improper conduct by law enforcement. Students will apply relevant criminological theories to understand well-known cases of police corruption, racial profiling, noble cause policing and use of excessive force. Students will understand how the powers afforded to police may be used to both uphold and undermine legitimate police practices. (Online Learning only). Prerequisite-OL224/PD224, and one of CC291/PD291, OL109, PD200, PD201

PD401 Civil Unrest:  The State’s Use of Force Against its Citizens

This course is designed to allow students to build upon either their work experience and/or previous security training. In this course, students will learn how to apply use of force theory along with the basic physical skills required to de-escalate/escape, mediate or gain control of human crisis situations. Students will use a multidisciplinary theoretical approach to identify the root causes of civil unrest and the importance of social media. Using case studies as examples, students will learn how to communicate, manage and ensure officer safety mechanisms such as principles of riot control that are set in place during periods of citizens/ civil unrest. Topics include the legal provisions for the use of force, the “fleeing felon” rule, police acts and standards and liability of police use of force. By the end of the course, students will have the knowledgeable and transfer skills to control and prevent civil riots using the appropriate force. (Online Learning only). Prerequisite- PD204 and one of CC291/PD291, OL109

PD402 Indigenous Communities and Policing

This course examines historical trauma and its generational impacts on First Nation Peoples. Students will learn from elders to better understand respectful ways of practicing law enforcement in First Nations communities and with Indigenous Peoples. They will learn to engage and acknowledge the varying supports and integral roles law enforcement officers offer in First Nations communities. The goal of this course is for law enforcement officials to gain a diverse understanding of the issues that face First Nations communities.

New prerequisite-  OL109 or PD201 

PD403 Immigration and Conflict Zones

An emphasis will be placed on providing law enforcement officers with the necessary skills to recognize, accept and be mindful of ethnic, racial, gender, religious and other forms of diversity within Canada. Using current case examples, students will be able to understand the importance of collaboration/consultation with community agencies, stakeholders and police chiefs to formulate new tactical approaches to crime within conflict zones. By the end of this course, students will have achieved the necessary skills to identify, address and maintain neutrality to resolve/stabilize external involvement with marginalized populations such as people living in poverty, First Nations and ethnic minorities. Additionally, they will have gained the necessary skills in resolving and stabilizing personal conflict within a multicultural workplace. (Online Learning only). Prerequisite- CC291/PD291 and PD301

PD404 Cybercrime

This course offers an in-depth exploration of the legal, social and technical issues related to cybercrime within a globalized context. Emerging legal responses to cybercrime will be discussed with reference to challenges facing law enforcement. Applied issues in cybercrime will also be considered, including the collection of digital forensic evidence, the preservation of rights guaranteed under the Charter and the logistics of leading cybercrime investigations across international jurisdictions. Relevant criminological theory will be used to guide discussions of the methods and motivations of cybercriminals. (Online Learning only). Prerequisite- CC291/PD291 and PD305

*CC426/PD426 Qualitative Methodologies in Criminology (Exclusion: PD400 6 week)

This course examines qualitative research methodologies in Criminology. It is designed to introduce students to epistemological issues that distinguish qualitative from quantitative methodologies and to provide an overview of dimensions of qualitative research methodologies, including research ethics, grounded theorizing, sampling, data collection techniques, and qualitative analysis. The course will assist in the development of the necessary critical thinking skills for critiquing and evaluating existing research on crime and deviance. Topics may include interviews, participant observation, interpretive research, ethnomethodology, historical research, discourse analysis, and feminist methodologies. Prerequisite-CC100 and CC233/OL233

Criminology Courses

CC100 – Introduction to Criminology

This course introduces students to the discipline of criminology from both a historical and a contemporary perspective. Students will be introduced to classical and contemporary theorists in the field, as well as research methods and disciplinary debates, with a focus on both Canadian and global issues in criminology.

CC102 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System

This course will examine the functions and structure of the major components of the Canadian criminal justice system. Students will be introduced to the roles played by various criminal justice organizations in the administration of justice. Topics may include police, criminal courts and trial procedures, sentencing, and corrections.

CC210 Psychology of Crime

This course will explore sources of individual variation in criminal conduct from a psychological perspective. Students will be introduced to classic biological, developmental, cognitive, and psychiatric explanations of criminal behaviour. Course topics will focus on associations between criminality and genetics, brain functioning, psychophysiology, mental disorders, personality and moral development, and social learning. Prerequisite- CC100

CC290 Theories of Crime I

An introduction to the sociological tradition of crime and deviance theory from the late 18th century (Classical School) to approximately the 1960s (emergence of labeling theory). Schools of thought to be covered include Classical Criminology, positivism, the Chicago School, subcultural theories, differential association and learning theories, Anomie and strain, control theories, and symbolic interaction/labeling. Prerequisite- CC100 or LY100

CC390 Theories of Crime II

An exploration of critical theories of criminology from 1970s to the present including such topics as social constructivist theories, Marxist theories, feminist theories, critical race theory, left-realism, routine activities theory, neo-classical theories, developmental criminology, post-modernism, Foucauldian governmentality theory, and integrated theories. Prerequisite- CC290

CC327 Statistics in Criminology and Criminal Justice

This course is designed to provide students with a basic knowledge of statistics and their interpretation as they apply to criminology and criminal justice issues. The course will assist in the development of the necessary critical thinking skills for critiquing and evaluating criminal justice research. Students will learn and apply the fundamentals of data analysis in criminal justice research, focusing on both descriptive and inferential statistics. Prerequisite-CC100 and CC233/OL233 or PS295

OL233/HS233/CC233  Introduction to Social Science Research Methods

(Exclusion:  PD300)

Building on BF290, this course provides an introduction to social science research methodologies that is designed to enable students to read, understand, and critically evaluate social science research as well as to prepare students for more specialized courses in qualitative and quantitative research. Students will learn the philosophical (i.e., ontological and epistemological) basis for quantitative, qualitative, deductive and inductive research, how to frame research questions, operationalize concepts, and design studies suitable to quantitative and qualitative research and the limitations and advantages of various research designs (e.g., cross-sectional, experimental, case studies, ethnographies). The relationship between theoretical concepts, constructs and variables will be examined. Students will be introduced to current issues regarding research ethics. For quantitative research, students will become familiar with different forms of data collection and the following concepts: levels of measurement, the central limit theorem, measures of central tendency and variance, hypothesis testing, the standard error and probability sampling. For qualitative research, students will become familiar with different forms of data collection (e.g., observations, interviews, textual analysis) and basic strategies to categorize and code qualitative material.

Prerequisite- BF290 or CC291/PD291 and registration status: senior student

CC291/PD291 Introduction to Policing

This course provides an introduction to policing in Canada, and includes an examination of: the historical development of police services; the organization of occupational roles within policing; legal powers of the police; traditional and contemporary models of police work; and current issues in policing. These dimensions of policing will be explored through both macro-level analyses that focus on the institutional contexts of policing and microlevel analyses that focus on the experiential aspects of policing.

Prerequisite- CC100 or CC102, senior student

CC/HS/PD312 Mental Health and Justice

Students will identify what constitutes a mental disorder and understand the prevalence of various mental illnesses in Canada. Students will focus on legal issues related to mental health including NCRMD and fitness to stand trial procedures, provincial mental health legislation, risk assessment and management techniques, violence risk and victimization, dangerousness and stigma, and criminal justice policy.

Prerequisite- CC100 or CC102, senior student

CC425 Advanced Quantitative Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice

This course is designed to provide students with an advanced application of social science research methods and statistics in criminology and criminal justice using SPSS (Predictive Analytics Software or PASW). The course aims to help students develop practical skills in the design and execution of criminal justice research and to strengthen essential statistical understanding and data analysis skills.

Prerequisite- CC100 and CC327 or PS296 and Year 4 status in Criminology or Policing

CC426/PD426 Qualitative Methodologies in Criminology

This course examines qualitative research methodologies in Criminology. It is designed to introduce students to epistemological issues that distinguish qualitative from quantitative methodologies and to provide an overview of dimensions of qualitative research methodologies, including research ethics, grounded theorizing, sampling, data collection techniques, and qualitative analysis. The course will assist in the development of the necessary critical thinking skills for critiquing and evaluating existing research on crime and deviance. Topics may include interviews, participant observation, interpretive research, ethnomethodology, historical research, discourse analysis, and feminist methodologies.

Prerequisite- CC100 and OL/CC/HS233 or PS295 and Year 4 status in Criminology or Policing

An additional 2.0 credits (4 x 0.5 credit courses) selected from a variety of senior level Criminology courses.  Online development is pending approvals.